The Seventh Generation

September 15, 2020

 

Iroquois Confederacy Constitution – The Tree of Peace The Seventh Generation takes its name from the Great Law of the Haudenosaunee, the founding document of the Iroquois Confederacy, the oldest living participatory democracy on Earth. It is based on an ancient Iroquois philosophy that:

“In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations.”

The Constitution of the Iroquois Nation (The Great Binding Law) explains “seventh generation” philosophy as follows: “The thickness of your skin shall be seven spans — which is to say that you shall be proof against anger, offensive actions and criticism. Your heart shall be filled with peace and good will and your mind filled with a yearning for the welfare of the people of the Confederacy. With endless patience you shall carry out your duty and your firmness shall be tempered with tenderness for your people. Neither anger nor fury shall find lodgement in your mind and all your words and actions shall be marked with calm deliberation. In all of your deliberations in the Confederate Council, in your efforts at law making, in all your official acts, self interest shall be cast into oblivion. Cast not over your shoulder behind you the warnings of the nephews and nieces should they chide you for any error or wrong you may do, but return to the way of the Great Law which is just and right. Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground — the unborn of the future Nation.” 

This philosophy is not unique to just the Iroquois nation. Many Native American nations, tribes and other indigenous people around the world have and still live by this philosophy

Today, The Seventh Generation Principle usually applies to decisions about the energy we use, water and natural resources, and ensuring those decisions are sustainable for seven generations in the future.

We should apply the Seventh Generation Principle to relationships – so that every decision we make results in sustainable relationships that last at least seven generations into the future.

In particular relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples should be forged with the Seventh Generation Principle in mind, so that future relationships will be positive for many generations to come.

 

The Great Peacemaker used a white pine, called the Tree of Peace, to symbolize the peace established by the Iroquoian Confederacy. The branches of the Tree of Peace represented protection. A far seeing eagle sat upon the top of the tree to symbolize a warning system if the tribes were in danger. Beneath the roots of the Tree of Peace a weapon was buried which symbolized that there would be no fighting between the Iroquois tribes.


Things That Make You Go Bohm

September 9, 2020

                “Have a mind that is open to everything and attached to nothing.”

Dr. Wayne Dyer

Out of the past 3,400 years, humans have been entirely at peace for only 268 of them, or just 8% of recorded history. Wars and conflict are created in the minds of men. The attachment to one way of thinking and believing without questioning other viewpoints and ideas has led to wars. When we raise children with keeping an open mind and heart, possibilities are endless. However, if we close ourselves off to different ways of believing, fear and conflict arise.

David Bohm was a physicist, philosopher, and explorer of consciousness, who developed the “theory of everything”.  He was merging science and spirituality which was a threat to others because people were not ready to receive his ideas of unity.

He was a deep thinker that explored the possibilities of infinite potential. Albert Einstein considered him his spiritual son, and the Dalai Lama thought of him as his science guru. Since the dawning of civilization, we have pondered deep questions.

What is the nature of our existence?

Who are we?

Where did we come from?

What is our purpose?

What is reality?

Are we any closer to answering these questions? Yes, and no! David Bohm bridged the gap between the micro and the macro. Where The theory of Relativity observed the laws of the universe and Quantum Physics observed the smallest particles of existence, they were completely polarized and not communicating with one another. There was no language to unite them. Bohm was able to see the unified field between the seen and unseen. He was able to bridge the gap and see the hidden variables between the worlds to see the limitless potential between the observer and the observed.  He saw that everything is connected. Every thought, every feeling, every action, and every particle is a part of the whole.

How does this relate to our lives today? Our world is in a mass consciousness of attachment to the seen world, that is at war with itself.  We want to cling on to the known without exploring the unknown. Our thoughts can lead us into an illusion of what we think is right. Our hearts are the unspoken language that allow us to viscerally communicate with one another. If we genuinely want peace and happiness, we must look beyond the veil of form and learn to solve problems through and integrative, holistic approach that unites us rather than divides us. The more we know, the more there is to know. The more we question, the more questions there are to answer. The day Bohm died, he made a phone call to his wife and said, “I think I’m on the edge of something.”

I had a mentor once who said, “If you’re not standing on your edge, your taking up way too much room.” What is your edge and what fills your heart with passion to explore the infinite realm of possibilities? Ah, the things that make you go Bohm!