Living a Life of Balance: Dean’s Story of Overcoming Addiction

October 19, 2017

Hello reader,

Here is a story from a contributing blogger. Their information is at the bottom if you wanted to learn more.

 

“The light within is a quiet source of truth and guidance. The key is to be still and know. If I am quiet for just a moment and listen and wait, the inner wisdom reveals the next indicated step.” – Robert, Addiction Survivor

Addiction is one of the greatest struggles someone could ever face. Not only does it wreak havoc on our bodies, but it turns our own minds against us by fooling us into thinking we can’t survive without the very substances that are destroying us. The silver lining is that there is always help available to those who are lost in their addictions, but there’s a catch: you must want to get better in order to heal.

 

Dean’s inspiring story demonstrates just how important this mindset is — and proves that there is always light at the end of the tunnel, no matter how long the journey there may be.

 

***

 

After moving from one end of the world to another when he was only seven, Dean did whatever he could not to feel like an outsider. Unfortunately, this often led him to make some destructive decisions.

 

“I was always trying to find a way to fit in,” he remembered. “Around the time I was 12 or 13, I started drinking alcohol and smoking weed. I spent years of my life as a pothead.”

 

He was hit hard when his parents decided to get divorced, and he started using even more dangerous drugs in order to cope.

 

“My friends started taking Roxycontin, Oxycontin,” he said. “I remember the very first time that I tried it. I wish I could go back to that first day and tell myself what was going to happen to me if I took that pill. I had no prior knowledge about opiates and didn’t realize how addictive they were. I became addicted really quickly.”

 

After six months, though, Dean realized he was on a dangerous path, and he sought treatment. Unfortunately, he didn’t yet have the mindset he needed in order to face his addiction issues.

 

He admitted, “At that time, I really didn’t believe I was an addict. I relapsed pretty quickly after that experience.”

 

He reached out for help again and re-entered treatment with a fresh perspective — but even that didn’t last.

 

“My second time in rehab was a three-month inpatient rehab. It was really intense. I had almost two years of sobriety after that: I was following the steps and had a sponsor — but I didn’t follow through.”

 

When he hit another difficult period, his addicted brain once again took over the part of his mind that knew he needed to take better care of himself.

 

“Around 12 months into my sobriety, my parents were going through another divorce,” he said. “Around my 18-month milestone, I stopped using the program I built for myself. I started telling myself, ‘I’m not a real addict. I can beat this.’ So, I started drinking and smoking weed again with the help of an unhealthy relationship I had with a girl. Within a few months, I was doing heroin again, too.”

 

Despite his struggles, Dean persisted — he knew he had to get help, and no matter how many times he fell, he realized he had to keep trying. He reached out to several different facilities, but his past experiences with rehab taught him that he needed something a little more unique, something that would treat his addiction with a holistic, rather than simply medical, approach.

 

That’s when he learned about adventure therapy, and found a place that offered this unique treatment and could start treating him immediately. Using a blend of individual and group therapy as well as activities like hiking and ziplining, he finally learned the skills he now knows he was missing all along.

 

“I learned balance,” he said. “I obviously had been in programs before, but at [this rehab center], I learned that a balance of my mind, body and spirit was the key to unlock my brain. I know the 12 steps and the rooms of AA and NA — I know the song and dance to acquire ‘clean time.’ But I was working 12-, 16-, 18-hour shifts — often times 14 days in a row without a day off. My mind, body and spirit were unbalanced, which pushed me into a depression, and that let me slip back into my addiction after almost having two years clean. [This facility] opened my eyes to what life can be like in balance.”

 

Dean feels that it all came down to changing his mindset.

 

“I learned that I was putting up a lot of roadblocks in my life: things like, ‘I can’t do this,’ ‘I’m not good enough,’ ‘I’m not smart enough.’”

 

Now, he puts what he learned into practice every day.

 

“I stick to my balanced program: mind, body and spirit,” he explained. “I keep those three things in mind and I do what I need to do to fulfill those needs. I go to meetings, I go to the gym, I talk to other people in the program, I connect with other alumni on Facebook.”

 

If you or someone you know is struggling, don’t be afraid to get help. As Dean proved, there is no shame in falling a few times as long as you get back up each time. Sometimes, it’s as simple as having a changed mindset, a renewed perspective — and a genuine willingness to get back on the right path.

Constance Ray started Recoverywell.org with the goal of creating a safe place for people to share how addiction has affected them, whether they are combating it themselves or watching someone they care about work to overcome it. The goal is to share stories of hope from survivors who know that the fight against addiction is one worth having, because no matter how it affects you, life can get better.

Constance Ray

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Life is Like A HeartBeat

February 10, 2016

life is like a heart beatLife is like a heartbeat. We have our ups and downs, our good times and not so good times, our highs and our lows. It is also like the tide, with high tides and low tides. Or it can be likened to the moon with all its fazes as well. There is a rhythm to its beat, and an ebb and flow. When we are balanced and calm we can flow through all the changes of life with ease, but when we allow our emotions to get the better of us, the rhythm becomes more extreme and erratic. These disturbances lead our bodies to get out of sync with the natural rhythm of life itself.   When this occurs, all other systems in your body get effected.

We need the contrast of life to know the difference between each other. We wouldn’t know the light if there was no darkness. What we need to understand is the balance between the two and stay in the dance of the opposites. This is the heartbeat of life.  If we didn’t have this heartbeat we would flat lined ________________________________.

So enjoy all of life’s ups and downs, it is all a part of the rhythm.

 

 

 


Will You Adapt to a New World?

August 5, 2015

Have you noticed the changes around you lately? Where are the butterflies? I’ve seen less than a hand full. Where are the beneficial insects, like the praying-Mantis and lady bugs, not to mention the bees?  Climate change is happening, although many people still don’t want to acknowledge it. What kind of world will we be living in if we do not make some conscious decisions on how we live our lives?

The divine feminine is a part of our consciousness and earth. She is assisting us to open our hearts and minds and think like the native Indians did. Sustainability, preservation, and compatibility. This will help us adapt to a new world filled with abundance for all. The sacred feminine energy is emerging, assisting us to recognize the integration of all living and sentient beings. The symbol of the Goddess is about balance, healing, and renewal.

So what kind of world do you want to live it? One filled will beauty, love, and compassion, or one of darkness and despair. How will you adapt to a new world?

” The life force of the divine feminine is the spark that will help us ignite a deeper spiritual, technological, and biological transformation. Her sustainability is our survival.”

Gloria Amendola

adaptation


Nature Deficit Disorder

November 18, 2014

nature deficit disorderIf you want to think clearer and feel better, spend some time in nature. The plant world holds the key to unlocking our confusion and troubles. It soothes our soul and provides life-giving oxygen for us to breath. I once owned and operated a horticultural business. I would install and maintain plants in homes and office’s. These plants brought the outside world inside and helped people become calmer, more productive and healthier. People need the connection with nature. In our technological world where many people sit in an office or indoors for most of the day never being exposed to any nature, a condition called nature dfecit disorder occurs. We become disconnected. Nature deficit disorder also is the disconnect from our food supply, our wanting to irraticate all insects, and anything that separates us from the natural world. When we learn to reconnect and live in harmony with our natural world, balance will be restored. So I invite you to spend some time in nature and reconnect with our life giving planet earth.


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